Framing the situational conversation

Different concepts have been created in the 20th century to allow scientists and researchers to better understand people and their behavior in groups. Some of these concepts have been created “after the fact” to describe why certain events have taken place, and researchers have then tried to merge these models into their new projects. Other… Continue reading

Fathoming your social #2

As discussed in the previous article, the SCARF model draws inspiration upon findings of brain-based social research. The importance of the approach-avoid response, as also stated in the article by David Rock, cannot be stressed enough. This is due to the strength of the biological response from the limbic system, namely the amygdala. This part… Continue reading

Fathoming your social #1

You may be wondering why I, an outspoken rival of over-complicating and over-using theoretical social models, keep coming back with some addition to this blog’s collection of resources. Simply put, I write about models which I have encountered, tested, and seen their added value. Come to think of it, a lot of the models are… Continue reading

Communication Games and how they structure #3

  For the purpose of getting acquainted with communication games, and how transactional analysis (TA) can help you gain a different perspective, first we must define a game. Communication games are described as follows: “A game is an ongoing series of complementary ulterior transactions progressing to a well-defined, predictable outcome. Descriptively, it is a recurring set… Continue reading